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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Antidepressant use by the breastfeeding mother: Clinical and economic consequences. found in the catalog.

Antidepressant use by the breastfeeding mother: Clinical and economic consequences.

Amy Lee

Antidepressant use by the breastfeeding mother: Clinical and economic consequences.

by Amy Lee

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  • 9 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

There is a paucity of data on the consequences of antidepressant use in breastfeeding women, compared to leaving the depression untreated, making it difficult to weigh the risk and benefits of both options to mother and child.Maternal self-report and report of infant health care utilization were compared to administrative records. No differences existed in agreement between data sources between reports by depressed mothers, and COMP mothers. Finally, maternal recall of infant feeding method over time was accurate for breastfeeding and formula feeding status, but less so for age when solids were introduced.Although depressed groups incurred greater costs and had poorer outcomes compared to the COMP, AD(+) women were achieving better outcomes compared to AD(-) without incurring greater costs. Although remote risks of exposure to the nursed infant cannot be dismissed, given the clinical and economic benefits found in the study, postpartum women with depression should not be discouraged from pharmacotherapy, even while breastfeeding.Mother-infant pairs were interviewed over the first year postpartum. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), and Functional Status II-Revised (FS-II(R)) were used to assess maternal depression, and maternal and infant well-being, respectively.Thus, the health and healthcare costs of depressed, breastfeeding women treated with antidepressants (AD(+)), and their infants were compared to those forgoing pharmacotherapy (AD(-)), and to healthy women (COMP) for the first year postpartum. The validity of maternal report of healthcare utilization, and the reliability of report of infant feeding methods were also examined.Fifty-five, 34, and 60 AD(+), AD(-), and COMP women, respectively, completed the study. EPDS scores differed between the groups; (AD(+): 6.5, AD(-): 10.5, COMP: 3.7, p<0.01), suggesting more depressive symptomatology in AD(-). AD(+) scores were higher than COMP, suggesting inadequate treatment. SF-36 mental component scores (AD(+): 49.8, AD(-) 45.8, COMP: 55.5, p<0.01) indicated more functional impairment in AD(-) women. The annual average costs per mother-infant pair from the provincial ministry of health perspective differed between the groups (AD(+): $1488.36, AD(-): $2054.54, COMP: $1082.29, p<0.05). From the societal perspective, both depressed groups incurred greater costs compared to COMP (AD(+): $3730.48, AD(-): $4129.45, COMP:$2757.41, p<0.01).

The Physical Object
Pagination182 leaves.
Number of Pages182
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21549543M
ISBN 109780494219980

Maternal depression is considered a risk factor for the socioemotional and cognitive development of current prevalence of depression in Canada averages at 6%, which is similar to the rates in other western countries (the female-to-male ratio average is ).However, the prevalence of postpartum depression is approximately 13%.Women of childbearing age are particularly at risk. Introduction. Although most women in the United States initiate breastfeeding, more than one half wean earlier than they desire addition, substantial disparities persist in initiation and duration of breastfeeding that affect population health example, in a sample of infants born between and , there was a % difference in the rate of initiation among black and white.

Introduction. Parents play a substantial role in shaping children’s emotional health, particularly in early childhood. 1 To better understand the impact of the parent-child relationship on the development of anxiety and depression in young children, research has focused on three main constructs 1) the degree to which a parent may be overprotective and/or critical, 2) parental modelling of. Mother Food for Breastfeeding Mothers by Hilary Jacobson provides advice on regulating insulin resistance and blood sugar levels through the use of diet and herbs. As for dieting to lose weight, a common concern of mothers with PCOS, remember that actively trying to lose weight while breastfeeding can damage a shaky milk supply.

However, given the choice between breastfeeding and formula feeding, there really is no competition. It can be difficult at times, especially in the beginning, but it will pay off during the lifetimes of both baby and mother. Most importantly, breastfeeding creates a bond between a mother and child that no one in the world can take away or replace.   Breastfeeding is a cornerstone of both short- and long-term health [1, 2].There are nutritional, immunological and psychological dose-related benefits for the child and as such exclusive breastfeeding can provide the greatest gains for infant development and some protection against childhood obesity and chronic disease in adult life [1–4].Health benefits for the mother include .


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Antidepressant use by the breastfeeding mother: Clinical and economic consequences by Amy Lee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Thesis Title: Antidepressant Use by the Breastfeeding Mother: Clinical and Economic Consequences Degree: PhD Year of Convocation: Name: Amy Lee Department and University: Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto ABSTRACT There is a paucity of data on the consequences of antidepressant use in breastfeeding women, compared to Author: Amy Lee.

Antidepressant use by the breastfeeding mother: Clinical and economic consequences; Author: Lee, Amy. Issue Date: Abstract (summary): There is a paucity of data on the consequences of antidepressant use in breastfeeding women, compared to leaving the depression untreated, making it difficult to weigh the risk and benefits of both options Author: Amy Lee.

According to the AAP, health care providers should weigh the risks and benefits when prescribing medications to breastfeeding mothers by considering the following: Need for the drug by the mother.

Potential effects of the drug on milk production. Amount of the drug excreted into human milk. Extent of oral absorption by the breastfeeding infant. Now in its third edition, Depression in New Mothers provides a comprehensive approach to treating postpartum depression in an easy-to-use format.

It reviews the research and brings together the evidence-base for understanding the causes and for assessing the different treatment options, including those that are safe for breastfeeding mothers.4/5(1).

The effects of SSRI use in pregnant mothers on their children bear all the hallmarks of gestational stress, which is associated with an increase in the prevalence of autism-like behaviors in rats.

J Hum Lact XX(X), XXXX Antidepressant Use in Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women 3 were depressed during pregnancy and postpartum. The authors found that babies born to mothers with. In a September clinical report, “The Transfer of Drugs and Therapeutics Into Human Breast Milk: An Update on Selected Topics,” the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) provides guidance to physicians regarding drug exposure and reaffirms the recommendation that most medications and immunizations are safe during lactation.

It is important for breastfeeding mothers to inform their child. 1 INTRODUCTION. Infantile colic is a common medical problem with potentially serious outcomes such as cessation of breastfeeding, post‐natal depression and Shaken Baby Syndrome.

1 It is one of the most common presentations of mother‐infant pairs to emergency departments. 2 Infantile colic, defined by the “Wessel Criteria” as paroxysms of crying episodes lasting for >3 h/d, for ≥3 d.

The effects of breastfeeding on postpartum depression are extremely heterogeneous, being conditioned by the intention of breastfeeding the future mother, but also by.

Conversely, mothers with an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score>12 at 1 week postpartum were significantly more likely at 4 and/or 8 weeks to discontinue breastfeeding, be unsatisfied with their.

The potential negative consequences of post-natal depression on mother as well as child have been well established in the literature. The negative consequences of maternal depression on the cognitive, motor and emotional development of the offspring have already been discussed much in the earlier literature (Kim, ).

Depression in women is second only to HIV/AIDS in terms of global morbidity (O’Hara, ). Depression in the postpartum period is a clinical depression that occurs within the first year after childbirth (Dennis, Heaman, & Vigod, ; O’Hara, ). The time factor and the milieu of role transition separate PPD from general depression.

Pediatricians need to be aware that mothers commonly use herbal supplements while breastfeeding, despite the lack of regulatory guidelines and rigorous scientific evaluation. Several resources on the safety and efficacy of herbs during breastfeeding can help guide clinical recommendations.

This chapter reviews what is known about the associations among depression in parents and parenting, child health, and child functioning, based on the large number of epidemiological and clinical studies that have documented these associations. Throughout our work, the committee recognized that depression exists in a broader context of comorbidities, correlates, and contexts.

Provide thoughtful guidance to the breastfeeding mother according to her circumstances, problems, and lifestyle from integrated coverage of evidence-based data and practical experience. Make appropriate drug recommendations, including approved medications, over-the.

stream effects of breastfeeding on depression. directly if breastfeeding mothers use a breast- Care Companion Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2 (6),   Introduction. Approximately 13 % of women experience postpartum depression (PPD) within the 14 weeks after giving birth [].If the antenatal period is also considered, as many as 19 % of women experience a depressive episode during pregnancy or the first 3 months postpartum [].Post-natal depression has an immediate impact on mothers and carries long-term risks for mothers’ future.

To date, the data indicate that antidepressant use in pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth; however, the clinical significance of this association remains unclear.

The risk, if real, may be for both untreated illness and antidepressant exposure-and therefore of little use in making treatment decisions. Side effects may worsen if you drink alcohol and take one of these drugs along with an antidepressant.

You may be at risk of a dangerous reaction if you take MAOIs. When combined with certain types of alcoholic beverages and foods, antidepressants called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) can cause a dangerous spike in blood pressure. Use of SSRI antidepressants in older people SSRIs are safer than tricyclic antidepressants for older people because they do not disturb heart rhythms and rarely cause dizziness that results in falls.

But liver function is less efficient in older people, so there is a greater risk of drug interactions involving the cytochrome P system. Antenatal depression, also known as prenatal or perinatal depression, is a form of clinical depression that can affect a woman during pregnancy, and can be a precursor to postpartum depression if not properly treated.

It is estimated that 7% to 20% of pregnant women are affected by this condition. Any form of prenatal stress felt by the mother can have negative effects on various aspects of. Peripartum depression affects up to one in seven women and is associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity if untreated.

A history of depression .Many mothers are inappropriately advised to discontinue breastfeeding or avoid taking essential medications because of fears of adverse effects on their infants.

This cautious approach may be unnecessary in many cases, because only a small proportion of medications are contraindicated in breastfeeding mothers or associated with adverse effects on their infants.