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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

1 edition of Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation found in the catalog.

Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation

Gene D. Amman

Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation

by Gene D. Amman

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Published in Ogden .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 7-8

SeriesU.S. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. U.S.D.A. Forest Service research note INT-171, USDA Forest Service research note INT -- 171.
The Physical Object
Pagination8 p. illus.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25603205M

A general review of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) - lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) complex, including previous broad-band remote sensing studies aimed at early detection, is provided. The main emphasis of this thesis is on the utility of waveform analysis, based on in-situ spectroscopy, to successfully differentiate between tree canopies experiencing. This chapter provides an overview regarding the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon) from the perspective of its ecological demands and the possibilities of its silvicultural utilization in Central European conditions. Described are its natural habitat, variability, ecological properties, and the environmental demands (natural mixtures, geological needs, soil, temperature Author: Petr Novotný, Martin Fulín, Jiří Čáp, Jaroslav Dostál.

In British Columbia and Alberta, the petitioner cites literature from , stating that given the extent of the current mountain pine beetle outbreak in lower elevation forests, a massive and imminent Pinus albicaulis decline is expected (NRDC , p. 27). Losses by were considered minor, but more recent data indicate that pine beetle. Partial cutting can reduce losses to mountain pine beetle The mountain pine beetle (MPB) continues to kill millions of lodgepole pine annually in the western United States. Harvesting susceptible trees or modifying stand conditions that are con- ducive to MPB infestation are .

Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah): Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation / (Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, ), also by Gene D. Amman, Bruce H. Baker, and Lawrence E. Stipe (page images at HathiTrust). Reduction of tree health by these infestations, especially pine-bark beetle on lodgepole pine, makes trees susceptible to other pathogenic epiphytes such as dwarf mistletoe. Recently, invasion of nonnative white-pine blister rust into the Rocky Mountains has caused mortality in whitebark pine and limber pine (Kendall and Schirokauer


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Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation by Gene D. Amman Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation. Ogden, Utah: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is a species of bark beetle native to the forests of western North America from Mexico to central British has a hard black exoskeleton, and measures approximately 5 mm, about the size of a grain of rice.

In western North America, the current outbreak of the mountain pine beetle and its microbial associates has destroyed wide areas Family: Curculionidae. Lodgepole pine losses to mountain pine beetle related to elevation DOWNLOAD NOW» Author: Gene D. Amman,Bruce H. Baker,Stipe, Lawrence E.,Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah).

Abstract. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is the most aggressive member of its genus in the western United States. Populations of the beetle periodically build up and kill most of the large dominant lodgepole pines, Pinus contorta var. latifolia, over vast beetle is indigenous to North America and probably has been active in lodgepole Cited by: Back to menu Mountain Pine Beetle.

Life History. Mountain pine beetle over winters mostly as larvae beneath (or within) the inner bark of host trees. Occasionally, pupae and callow adults may also overwinter. In most lodgepole and ponderosa pine stands, larvae pupate at the ends of their feeding galleries in late spring.

Request PDF | Verbenone Reduces Mountain Pine Beetle Attack in Lodgepole Pine | Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is the most common.

Mountain pine beetle and forest carbon feedback to climate change Article (PDF Available) in Nature () May with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Safrenyik, L. Mountain pine beetle: biology overview. In: Proceedings: Symposium on the Management of Lodgepole Pine to Minimize Losses to the Mountain Pine Beetle, pp.

USDA Forest Service, Intermountian Forest and Range Experiment Station, General Technical Report INT This Contribution to Book is brought to you for free and.

Research Highlights: The biology of mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, in Colorado’s lodgepole pine forests exhibits similarities and differences to other parts of its range. Brood emergence was not influenced by stand density nor related to tree diameter. The probability of individual tree attack is influenced by stocking and tree by: 1.

Because mountain pine beetle populations have historically been larger in lower-elevation forests, it has been assumed that lower-elevation forests serve as source points for attacks, with upper-elevation whitebark pine acting as "spill-over" sinks for mountain pine beetles [12,27,46,].

However, experimental evidence is lacking. Abstract. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), is generally considered the most destructive of all Western forest insects.

46 Periodic outbreaks may devastate entire forests, comprising millions of hectares. Between andmore than 79 million trees were killed by this insect in the United States alone.

57 Total North American losses to Cited by: The current mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonous ponderosae Hopkins) epidemic has severely affected pine forests of Western Canada and killed millions of hectares of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.

ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) forest. Generally, MPB attack larger and older (diameter > 20 cm or >60 years of age) trees, but the current epidemic extends this limit with attacks on Cited by: 5.

This report describes the habits and habitat of the mountain pine beetle and presents methods for land managers to reduce bark beetle related losses in managed stands and for high value trees. The mountain pine beetle shows a strong preference for lodgepole pine of large diameter and 80 years of age or older.

This profusely illustrated pamphlet from the USA on the control of Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk. on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) in unmanaged stands in the Rocky Mountains includes a description of the life-history and injuriousness of the scolytid and a discussion of injuriousness in relation to tree diameter, phloem thickness, tree age, stand density and elevation and Cited by: Recent mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae; MPB) outbreaks have caused one of the most widespread and dramatic changes in forest condition i.

Safranyik, Shrimpton, and Whitney () summarized years of work on mountain pine beetle/lodgepole pine biology and ecology and developed management guidelines to reduce losses in Canadian forests.

Infestations in stands with an average diameter over 8 inches, that are over 80 years old, and are in the hotter and drier areas of the species.

Fig. 2a–c shows the influence of bark beetle mortality on various fuels characteristics during the period between bark beetle refer to this period of time as the bark beetle rotation for Engelmann spruce, Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine.

Each of the seven graphs were derived from fuels data collected in stands with endemic, epidemic and post-epidemic populations of bark beetles Cited by: Lodgepole pine stands harbour a major commercial significance in British Columbia. The lodgepole pine forests not only make up half of the British Columbia Interior annual harvest, but are also highly utilized and acceptable for lumber and pulp production.

Unfortunately, mature lodgepole pine stands have been surmounted by outbreaks of mountain pine beetle, which is the most destructive insect. By the s, much of the lodgepole pine forests in Yellowstone were between and years old and approaching the end of their life-cycle.

The mountain pine beetle killed a number of trees in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem from the late s through the mids. This created a heterogeneous forest in which old surviving trees were Cause: 42 by lightning, 9 by humans.

Large lodgepole pines are more susceptible to mountain pine beetle attack than small trees because phloem must be ≥ mm thick to support good beetle reproduction (Amman & Safranyik, ).

As a result, mature stands with high percentages of basal area in trees with phloem thickness > 6 mm are especially susceptible to mountain pine beetle Cited by:.

Progress 10/01/16 to 09/30/17 Outputs OUTPUT: A total of 70 papers were published during FY17 in this Problem Area.

Important highlights in this problem area include knowledge develop and technology transfer in areas such as resistance to a non-native pathogen in limber pine, the vulnerability of high elevation pines to climate change-induced mountain pine beetle attack, conserving threatened.As such, failures for protecting lodgepole pine from mountain pine beetle attack were initially attributed to inadequate distribution of the active ingredient following injections made ~5 weeks prior to trees coming under attack by mountain pine beetle.

The authors commented that injecting trees in the fall and/or increasing the number of Cited by: Lodgepole pine regeneration following fires in the middle and latter 's ap- parently formed a contiguous food base, which allowed widespread proliferation of the beetle by the late 's.

The mountain pine beetle, a food-limited in- sect, may not have been able to spread as extensively prior to settlement because of a fire-caused mosaic of.